Regular

Bee Fact No. 10

There are many other ways you can help bees, too. Avoid using pesticides in your garden, plant some herbs and bee-friendly plants, and shop for certified organic food, since on average, plant, insect and bird life is 50% more abundant on organic farms.

Regular

Bee Fact No. 8

They’re mighty mathematicians, capable of solving what mathematicians call the “traveling salesman problem,” that even stumps some computers. The traveling salesman problem asks the following question: “Given a list of cities and the distances between each pair of cities, what is the shortest possible route that visits each city and returns to the origin city?” Researchers have found that bumblebees fly the shortest route possible between flowers, making them the only animals known to able to solve the problem.

Regular

Bee Fact No. 4

A beehive in summer can have as many as 50,000 to 80,000 bees, with 556 worker bees required to gather a pound of honey. Also, bumblebees are round and fuzzy; honeybees are smaller and thinner, and while honeybees have a clear distinction between head and abdomen, bumblebees are “all of one piece.” Honeybees also have two clear sets of wings: a larger set in front and a smaller set in back.

Regular

Bee Fact No. 3

Now let’s move on to another common thing we associate bees with: honey! Globally, there are more honeybees than other types of bee and pollinating insects, making them the world’s most important pollinator of food crops. There are three kinds of bees in a hive: Queen, Worker and Drone. The worker bees are all female, and perform all the work for the hive.

Regular

Bee Fact No. 2

Bee stings may also ease pain associated with rheumatoid arthritis, according to researchers at the University of Sao Paulo. The team found that molecules in bee venom increase the body’s level of glucocorticoid, an anti-inflammatory hormone.

Regular

Bee Fact No. 1

Let’s get what we fear the most about them out of the way: their sting. The first thing you should know is that it actually has some benefits! A toxin in bee venom called melittin may prevent HIV, according to scientists at Washington University in St. Louis<http://news.wustl.edu/news/Pages/25061.aspx>. The melittin can kill HIV by poking holes into the virus’s protective envelope.

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!